Corn Flakes For Weight Loss- Fact Or Myth?

Corn flakes include a number of vitamins and minerals with the power to meet the daily nutritional requirements. But there are talks that corn flakes is not a good option if you’re trying to lose weight. Which is which?

Do you have corn flakes for breakfast? And are you under the impression that they are healthful and ideal for weight loss? The it’s time you reconsider. Because, contrary to popular belief, cornflakes don’t aid in weight loss. They instead contribute to weight gain.

(C) Everyday Health

Would you like to know more about corn flakes and weight loss? Keep reading.

Corn Flakes – An Overview

Corn flakes were developed accidently by Will Kellogg and his brother John Kellogg in 1983, with stale wheat. He and his brother made dough out of the stale wheat and then pushed it through a roller, but the outcome was broken flakes of wheat, which was toasted and served to patients at Seventh-day Adventist sanatorium where they worked. Their patients liked them, so they continued making it and worked on it till it became perfect. This was how corn flakes were developed, and now there are many brands available in the market that brag about their quality and ability to reduce weight.

Are Corn Flakes Health Food?

A cereal can be a good breakfast option if you select one that has less sugar and fat and also contains the right amount of nutrients. But if you make wrong choices, your cereal may contribute to weight gain.

Read more: http://www.stylecraze.com/articles/corn-flakes-for-weight-loss-fact-or-myth

 

How to Find & Fix a Roof Leak

How do I know if my roof is leaking? What do I do if I find a leak? Finding roof leaks will become your obsession. However, there is a simple step by step process that will help you know what to do when you find a leak.

Expert advice on how to find, troubleshoot and fix a roof leak, including what to do in a roof leak emergency.

The source of most roof leaks is hard to find because it originates away from where the leak shows up. In order to find the source of a leak, follow a roofer’s advice and “think like water.”
Water typically comes in through worn, broken, or missing shingles; where nails have worked loose; or through corroded or poorly sealed roof flashing around vents, skylights, or chimneys or along the intersections of roof planes.

Once water passes the roofing, it flows along the sheathing, roof rafters, or topside of ceilings until it finds a place to drip down—inevitably onto your favorite piece of furniture.
Look for a roof leak during the day. Go into the attic with a bright flashlight; step only on secure framing members and never on the insulation or topside of the ceiling below—neither of these will support you! Start above the place where the drip has occurred and work your way uproof, looking for wetness along the framing members.

If the weather has been dry for a while, look for water marks, stains, or discolorations on the wood made by moisture. Then switch off the light and try to find a hole where daylight shows through the roof. (With a wood-shingle roof, you’ll see many such places, but while the overlapped shingles let light show through they shed water.) If it’s still raining, put a bucket under the leak in an area with proper support. Let the bucket collect the drips and fix the leak when the weather clears.

Read more:  https://www.hometips.com/repair-fix/roof-leaks.html