Antibiotic Prescribing Guidelines

Have you ever taken your child to the doctor and been told he has a cold or the flu and the doctor prescribes antibiotics? Check out these guidelines to avoid overused of the said medicine to your kids

Antibiotics are commonly prescribed unnecessarily for colds, the flu, coughs and bronchitis, and viral sore throats, etc.

Overuse Is a Big Problem

This overuse of antibiotics can lead to unwanted side effects, including diarrhea and allergic reactions. Perhaps even more importantly, the overuse of antibiotics is leading to more bacteria gaining the ability to resist antibiotics. These antibiotic-resistant bacteria are more difficult to treat, often require stronger antibiotics, and can cause life-threatening infections.

You can help prevent the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by making sure your child only takes an antibiotic when he needs it and then takes it as prescribed. Understanding the latest antibiotic treatment guidelines for ear infections and sinus infections, which include options to observe your child without antibiotics, might also help decrease the overuse of antibiotics.

(C) Today’s Parent

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Antibiotics for Ear Infections

Ear infections are the most common condition for which antibiotics are prescribed in children.

Guidelines that were released in 2004 have helped to decrease some of those prescriptions, as they recommended an “observation option” for some children with ear infections. These children who could safely be observed for two to three days without treatment with an antibiotic included those who were at least 2-years-old and had mild symptoms.

Read more: https://www.verywell.com/antibiotic-prescribing-guidelines-2633401

 

This Is What the Last 100 Years of Landscape Design Looks Like

I was fascinated when I saw this article how landscaping evolve to how it was today. Though there are peculiar designs but some designs are still there in our modern landscape. Check this out and be amazed!

(C) Houzz

Designed landscapes are omnipresent, but it can be easy to walk through, drive by or look down on them without even noticing they’re there. They can feel less designed than buildings, more subtle, but their unique ability to shape communities and affect the environment means landscapes should be noticed, now more than ever.

That’s what architect and editor, and former Houzz contributor, John Hill has done in his new book 100 Years, 100 Landscape Designs, in which he chronicles and examines significant landscape designs of the past century, including residential gardens, cemeteries, land art and sculpture gardens. The book is formatted like an illustrated timeline, but it’s also a useful travel guide, as all landscapes included are accessible to the public. “Now as I travel, I find myself wanting to visit landscapes as much as or more than I want to see buildings,” he says.

In addition to Hill’s various selection criteria, all landscapes featured are open to the public, though some require fees. When pinning down dates for the projects, Hill generally used opening dates or ceremonies for public gardens and building start dates for private gardens.

1. The Huntington Botanical Gardens
Year: 1919
Designer: William Hertrich
Location: San Marino, California

Industrialist Henry E. Huntington founded the botanical gardens on his 600-acre plot of land in Los Angeles in 1919, and in 1928 he first opened them up to the public. Horticulturist and garden superintendent William Hertrich spent decades on the property, building the lily ponds, Palm Garden, Japanese Garden and Desert Garden. The Huntington now houses a world-class collection of plants.

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