How To Replace An Electrical Outlet

 When it comes to your electrical system, having safe and consistent power is the key to maintaining your safety and the life of your electronics. Replacing electrical outlets, although relatively easy, should only be done if you feel completely confident and comfortable working with electricity.

If an outlet (commonly called a receptacle) no longer holds a plug snugly, it should be replaced. The procedure for replacing a duplex (two-outlet) wall receptacle is similar to that of replacing a switch. The only difference is that, depending on where the receptacle is located in the wiring scheme of your house, it may have more wires attached to it than you find attached to a light switch.

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Look closely at the terminal screws of the new duplex receptacle. On each side of the receptacle is a pair of terminal screws. The upper screw is connected to the upper outlet, and the lower screw services the lower outlet. A thin, metal break-off tab connects these screws. This tab enables you to attach a single wire to either screw and feed electricity to both outlets of the receptacle. If the tab is broken off, you can connect the upper and lower outlets to separate wires and control them independently.

If the receptacle is wired to the end of a series of receptacles, it usually has only two wires, and possibly a third ground wire. If it isn’t the last receptacle, two additional wires may be connected to it in order to carry current to the next receptacle. Just rewire the new receptacle the same way the old one was wired.

Read more:  http://www.dummies.com/home-garden/home-improvement/electrical-wiring/how-to-replace-an-electrical-outlet

 

7 Types of Microwaves You Should Know About (2017 Buying Guide)

Do you want to buy a new microwave oven? That is nice, but wait a minute! Microwave ovens come in a number of sizes and builds. What kind you choose will depend on your needs as well as the amount of space available.

When microwaves first hit the scene, most people bought who bought one put it on their counter. They had existing kitchens and there weren’t the location advancements there is today.

However, it didn’t take long for kitchen designers and builders to come up with more convenient locations where they wouldn’t take up counter space. The result is that now you have many microwave location options which means there are several types of microwaves since not all can be placed in all locations. For example, to mount a microwave below a cabinet, you’re best off buying a microwave designed for being mounted beneath a cabinet.

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What I think is the best part about more convenient locations is that they are at better heights than on the counter. When on the counter, you have to bend over to choose settings. Ours, as an example, is built-into the wall above our wall oven and so it’s just below my chin which makes for a very easy level to use. Personally, I much prefer microwaves to suspended, hung, or built in above the counter.

Nevertheless, these days there are all kinds, sizes, colors and styles of microwaves. The one thing that doesn’t vary too much are the features. Sure, the number of power levels may vary as well as the number of cooking presets (popcorn, pizza, potato, etc.), but those are the key features in addition to manually setting the cooking time.

Read more: https://www.homestratosphere.com/microwave-types